Ron & Doug's Sales Camp https://www.pressurecleaningschool.com/events/houston-sales-training-school/
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Member Sophomore Undergraduate Les Howington's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    66

    Bleach or Chlorine? Safe or Toxic?

    For those of you who use chlorine in place of bleach or for those that may be thinking about it, below is some information that may help you decide which to use.


    Household bleach and chlorine are not the same thing.

    What is chlorine?
    Chlorine is an element used to disinfect water and produce such products as drugs, plastics and pesticides.

    What is household bleach?

    it has just as much chlorine as common table salt (sodium chloride, NaOH)
    chlorine is just one ingredient required to make bleach
    Bleach is produced by combining chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide).
    This forms a new product, sodium hypochlorite, the active ingredient in bleach.
    Bleach is a 5.25% solution of sodium hypochlorite and water.

    The use of household bleach does not lead to the formation of dioxin, does not harm the ozone layer, and does not lead to the formation of toxic substances which can build up in the food chain.

    Household bleach is essentially non-toxic if ingested.
    It is not considered corrosive by any government regulatory definition, including the strict standards set by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.
    Household bleach is also an emetic, which means that when swallowed, it will normally cause vomiting.
    Since household bleach is not corrosive to the esophagus or gastrointestinal tract, there is no lasting damage to the body from accidental ingestion.
    These findings are supported by studies monitoring accidental bleach ingestion, as reported to poison control centers.
    Additionally, household bleach does not pose any long-term health concerns.
    Sodium hypochlorite, the active ingredient in household bleach, has been shown in laboratory tests not to be a cause of cancer, and the International Agency for
    Research on Cancer concluded in 1990 that hypochlorite salts could not be classified as carcinogenic.
    However, bleach is a skin and eye irritant. Direct contact with eyes or prolonged contact with skin can cause temporary irritation; first aid is to flush the area with water.


    What is Chlorine?

    Chlorine is a greenish yellow gas with an irritating odor, or present in liquid solutions.
    It is used in making solvents, man-made chemicals, disinfectants, and chlorine bleach cleaners.

    How can Chlorine affect me?

    Acute short term health effects:
    Irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. It can include tearing, coughing, sputum, bloody nose, and chest \pain. Higher levels cause a buildup of fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) and death.
    Chronic health effects:
    Chlorine can irritate the lungs. Repeated exposure may cause bronchitis to develop with cough, phlegm, and /or shortness of breath
    Long term exposure can damage teeth.

    If symptoms develop or over-exposure is suspected, the following may be useful

    Lung function tests
    any evaluation should include a careful history of past and pre-
    symptoms with an exam.

    Consider X-ray after acute over-exposure.


    Mixed Exposure

    Because smoking can cause heart disease, as well as lung cancer emphysema, and other respiratory problems, it may worsen respiratory conditions caused by chemical exposure. Even if you have smoked for a long time, stopping now will reduce your risk of developing health problems.


    Prevention

    Unless a less toxic chemical can be substituted for a hazardous substance, engineering controls are the most effective way of reducing exposure.
    The best protection is to enclose operations and/or provide local exhaust ventilation at the site of chemical release. Isolating operations can also reduce exposure.
    Isolating operations can also reduce exposure.
    Using respirators or protective equipment (such as gloves, suits, footwear, headgear, goggles) is less effective than the controls mentioned above, but is sometimes necessary.

  • #2
    Member Junior Undergraduate Vrollingthunder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    166
    Thanks Les, I will make a copy to keep in my files. Sometimes people always ask us about bleach,now we will be able to give a good reply. After reading this I don't think I would fool around with chlorine. Anna

  • #3
    Member Freshman Undergraduate
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    B'HAM AL
    Posts
    2
    in my experience, when you buy "liquid chlorine" what you are actually getting is a 12 0r 12 1/2% solution of sodium hypochlorite, the active ingredient in bleach. the choice ultimately turns on which is cheaper and more convenient to purchase. NOTE: i am only talking about "liquid chlorine" not the powdered variety, about which i know nothing.

  • #4
    Softwashing Instructor/Moderator Graduate Student taselton2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tallahassee,Florida
    Posts
    654

    Bleach Or Chlorine

    Les,
    I THINK WHEN PEOPLE SAY "CHLORINE", THEY ARE TALKING ABOUT "POOL BLEACH" OR "POOL SHOCKER". THIS COMES IN LIQUID FORM AND IS EASILY DILUTED WITH WATER. POOL BLEACH IS SODIUM HYPOCHROLRITE @ 10.5%. THIS IS TWICE THE STRENGTH OF HOUSE HOLD BLEACH, BUT THE SAME INGREDIENTS.

    TIM

  • #5
    Member Freshman Undergraduate
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Marcy, NY 13403
    Posts
    12

    Question Use of Metal

    How does the hypochloride effect painted metal siding? (or does it when pre-wet?)
    Mike
    Last edited by All Brite PWS; 02-27-2007 at 01:52 PM. Reason: spelling error

  • #6
    Exterior Restoration Specialist 21000 PLUS POSTER Ron Musgraves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    46,536
    happy b-day Less
    Ron Musgraves


    Text Me if you need Help 4805225227

    Join My Facebook Page follow Me https://www.facebook.com/ronmusgraves

    Check out My Twitter https://twitter.com/pressurewashusa

  • #7
    Commercial Pressure Wash Expert and PWI Administrator 19000 PLUS POSTER Russ Spence's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Fairhope Alabama
    Posts
    19,085
    HAPPY B DAY Les !!!!!!!

  • #8
    Exterior Restoration Specialist 21000 PLUS POSTER Ron Musgraves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    46,536
    Quote Originally Posted by Les Howington View Post
    For those of you who use chlorine in place of bleach or for those that may be thinking about it, below is some information that may help you decide which to use.


    Household bleach and chlorine are not the same thing.

    What is chlorine?
    Chlorine is an element used to disinfect water and produce such products as drugs, plastics and pesticides.

    What is household bleach?

    it has just as much chlorine as common table salt (sodium chloride, NaOH)
    chlorine is just one ingredient required to make bleach
    Bleach is produced by combining chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide).
    This forms a new product, sodium hypochlorite, the active ingredient in bleach.
    Bleach is a 5.25% solution of sodium hypochlorite and water.

    The use of household bleach does not lead to the formation of dioxin, does not harm the ozone layer, and does not lead to the formation of toxic substances which can build up in the food chain.

    Household bleach is essentially non-toxic if ingested.
    It is not considered corrosive by any government regulatory definition, including the strict standards set by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.
    Household bleach is also an emetic, which means that when swallowed, it will normally cause vomiting.
    Since household bleach is not corrosive to the esophagus or gastrointestinal tract, there is no lasting damage to the body from accidental ingestion.
    These findings are supported by studies monitoring accidental bleach ingestion, as reported to poison control centers.
    Additionally, household bleach does not pose any long-term health concerns.
    Sodium hypochlorite, the active ingredient in household bleach, has been shown in laboratory tests not to be a cause of cancer, and the International Agency for
    Research on Cancer concluded in 1990 that hypochlorite salts could not be classified as carcinogenic.
    However, bleach is a skin and eye irritant. Direct contact with eyes or prolonged contact with skin can cause temporary irritation; first aid is to flush the area with water.


    What is Chlorine?

    Chlorine is a greenish yellow gas with an irritating odor, or present in liquid solutions.
    It is used in making solvents, man-made chemicals, disinfectants, and chlorine bleach cleaners.

    How can Chlorine affect me?

    Acute short term health effects:
    Irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. It can include tearing, coughing, sputum, bloody nose, and chest \pain. Higher levels cause a buildup of fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) and death.
    Chronic health effects:
    Chlorine can irritate the lungs. Repeated exposure may cause bronchitis to develop with cough, phlegm, and /or shortness of breath
    Long term exposure can damage teeth.

    If symptoms develop or over-exposure is suspected, the following may be useful

    Lung function tests
    any evaluation should include a careful history of past and pre-
    symptoms with an exam.

    Consider X-ray after acute over-exposure.


    Mixed Exposure

    Because smoking can cause heart disease, as well as lung cancer emphysema, and other respiratory problems, it may worsen respiratory conditions caused by chemical exposure. Even if you have smoked for a long time, stopping now will reduce your risk of developing health problems.


    Prevention

    Unless a less toxic chemical can be substituted for a hazardous substance, engineering controls are the most effective way of reducing exposure.
    The best protection is to enclose operations and/or provide local exhaust ventilation at the site of chemical release. Isolating operations can also reduce exposure.
    Isolating operations can also reduce exposure.
    Using respirators or protective equipment (such as gloves, suits, footwear, headgear, goggles) is less effective than the controls mentioned above, but is sometimes necessary.
    Where is LES ? NOW
    Ron Musgraves


    Text Me if you need Help 4805225227

    Join My Facebook Page follow Me https://www.facebook.com/ronmusgraves

    Check out My Twitter https://twitter.com/pressurewashusa

  • #9
    Exterior Restoration Specialist 21000 PLUS POSTER Ron Musgraves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    46,536
    This is a very Good Blog about Bleach
    Ron Musgraves


    Text Me if you need Help 4805225227

    Join My Facebook Page follow Me https://www.facebook.com/ronmusgraves

    Check out My Twitter https://twitter.com/pressurewashusa

  • Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Bookmarks

    Bookmarks

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •