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  1. #1
    Member Senior Undergraduate
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    Baker City, Or
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    Milky Oil in Pump

    the Oil in my Anno Reverbi pump is milky. What is the best way to remove the contaminated oil? and should the pump be flushed? and w/what?

    Douglas Hicks
    General Fire Equipment Co of Eastern Oregon, Inc

  • #2
    Distributor Freshman Undergraduate Bob Williamson's Avatar
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    May 2003
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    Cleveland, Oh
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    Douglas,

    You can change the oil a couple times in a row, that will get rid of the water that is in your oil. But you need to find out how the water got in the oil.

    Bad seals will only (usaully) cause low pressure or a drip between the manifold and the crankcase. It sounds like you may have a hair line crack in one of your plungers. Some AR pumps have ceramic coated plungers and the coating wears off or chips.

    Robert Williamson

  • #3
    Member 7000 PLUS POSTER Scott Stone's Avatar
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    The V-Packings keep the water in the head. There are also oil seals that can go bad, and they can be replaced. You have to take off the head, and remove the plungers, then pull them out, and replace with new ones. It is not too hard of a job, but I usually end up throwing the whole pump out and spending $300 for a new one.

    Scott Stone
    www.gen2genbooks.com
    Scott Stone
    A Mind for Detail Inc.
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    Phoenix, Arizona Parking Garage Cleaning Expert
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  • #4
    Member Sophomore Undergraduate
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    Nov 2003
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    Florida
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    I would not jump to conclusions or go buy a new pump just yet.

    The white residoo in your oil is definately from water as previosly stated.
    But it might not be a blown seal or packing.
    Do you live anywhere where it is pretty cold out now?
    If so
    it could also be from
    something called emulsification (like mayonaise).
    Which is just condensation that got trapped inside your oil.
    If you use your pressure washer for very small amounts of time in the winter this can happen.
    If this is the case than
    get the motor hot and it will burn off in time.
    If there is a lot of that milky white stuff than I would flush it, put new oil in the machine and leave the machine INSIDE with the oil cap OFF for about 24 hours. This will give any moisture trapped inside a chance to evaperate.

  • #5
    Member Senior Undergraduate
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    Baker City, Or
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    I dunno, Rocko, is -20 cold? It was that cold here earlier this month, instead of our normal +20 temps. I did not think about the mayo effect. We did use the PW about 8 hours on Wed and Thursday. We did change oil today. My helper took the pump off and took it into the warm shop and drained the oil. I will leave the cap loose tommorrow when we go to work. If that doesn't cure the problem, we will repair the spare pump and then order parts for the A/R

    Douglas Hicks
    General Fire Equipment Co of Eastern Oregon, Inc
    Douglas Hicks
    General Fire Equipment Co of Eastern Oregon, Inc
    Baker City, OR 97814
    541.523.7600 Voice
    fireman@eoni.com
    Memberships
    NFPA # 0123425
    National Fire Sprinkler Association
    National Association of Fire Equipment Distributors
    Oregon Fire Equipment Dealers, founding board member

  • #6
    Member Junior Undergraduate
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    Jan 2002
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    Heart of Texas
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    Douglas,
    The condition that Rocko T is refering to typicaly takes place under high humidity conditions.

    Based on the temps. you gave it should be very, very dry there.

    I would bet that Scott's daignosis is correct.
    Last edited by beyoungsr; 01-21-2004 at 06:46 PM.

  • #7
    Member Graduate Student mtngoat's Avatar
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    551
    I seem to have better luck with the Comet/General pumps Then I have had with the AR.
    We have never used a CAT pump but i hear good things about them. Mtngoat.
    COTTER CO.
    Specializing in grease removal from
    Restaurant & Eatery Equipment
    Tim Cotter
    570-727-3832
    Pennsylvania & NY.

  • #8
    Member Freshman Undergraduate
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    Sep 2003
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    UK
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    Milky oil is a problem will ALL pumps. All pumps have a breather and as they get hot the air in them expands out through the breather. When you switch it off the pump cools and draws in air that is normally humid. The water condenses and next time you use the pump mixes with the oil. Over time the amount of water increases and so the oil goes milky. This is normal when operating in a damp environment. There is no cure except to change the oil from time to time. (Like it says in the book!!)

  • #9
    Exterior Restoration Specialist 21000 PLUS POSTER Ron Musgraves's Avatar
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    white milky oil in my pUMP 1
    Ron Musgraves


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